Showing posts with label UNICEF. Show all posts
Showing posts with label UNICEF. Show all posts

Saturday, July 23, 2011

UNICEF: Horn of Africa is a "Crisis for Child Survival"

Hunger is eating up the poor children in Ethiopia, Somalia and Kenya while children in America and other developed nations are over fed and obese.

~ Orikinla Osinachi, Nigerian poet and blogger




22 Jul 2011 16:15 Africa/Lagos


UNICEF: Horn of Africa is a "Crisis for Child Survival"
Children's agency massively scaling up operations to respond to urgent needs

PR Newswire

NEW YORK, July 22, 2011

NEW YORK, July 22, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- With famine now declared in two regions of Southern Somalia and malnutrition rates at emergency levels in arid and semi-arid regions across the Horn of Africa, nearly 720,000 children are at risk of death without urgent assistance. In total 2.23 million children in Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia are estimated to be acutely malnourished.

"This summer has been an unspeakable nightmare for millions of children in the Horn of Africa," said President and CEO of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF Caryl Stern. "We cannot control the weather patterns that have led to drought and famine, but we can do something about helping those who suffer from it. The sooner we act, the more children's lives can be saved. As little as $10 can feed a child for 10 days."

So far this month, by plane, truck and ship, UNICEF has delivered 1,300 metric tons of life saving supplies to some of the hardest hit areas in southern Somalia, including enough therapeutic supplies to treat over 66,000 malnourished children. In the next few months, UNICEF will expand supplementary feeding to reach 240,000 children and expand as quickly as is possible to reach more children and their families. $1.2 million in UNICEF emergency supplies have been dispatched to the Somali region of Ethiopia, and UNICEF has provided partners in Kenya with $1.4 million in supplies for children in camps and drought-affected pastoral areas.

Supplies prepositioned within the region had already been used to reach children in remote drought-affected communities, as well as children in camps for refugees and internally displaced people. UNICEF is working with partners in the field to see how it can expand existing operations and build on opportunities like Child Health days that happen on a regular basis in many parts of the region.

"We are gearing up our logistics to deliver unprecedented supplies of therapeutic and supplementary foods across the Horn," said Shanelle Hall, Director of UNICEF's supply division. "If we are to save lives, we need to act now – to bring in massive quantities of medicines, vaccines, nutrition supplies into the region as quickly as we are able and then get them out to the children who need it most."

"UNICEF is using every means possible to reach every child. There simply can be no compromise on the objective to keep children and their families alive," said Elhadj As Sy, Regional Director for UNICEF Eastern and Southern Africa. "Every life must count, and we cannot afford to lose more lives to this crisis."

Insecticide-treated mosquito nets to prevent malaria and essential medicines, including vaccines, are being airlifted to support massive vaccination campaigns that will be conducted over the coming weeks to prevent the outbreak of disease. To expand provision of safe water and access to sanitation, boreholes will be drilled and rehabilitated; water trucking and hygiene activities will be expanded.

"We appreciate the generosity of the international community and those contributions are already making a difference. We urgently need more funds to meet the enormous need. Every minute that they are without lifesaving support is the difference between life and death," Sy said.

UNICEF estimates it will need $100 million over the next six months for a massive scale up of operations to reach children in the drought affected areas with emergency and preventative assistance.

For more information or to make a tax-deductible contribution to relief efforts in the Horn of Africa, please contact the U.S. Fund for UNICEF:

Website: www.unicefusa.org/donate/horn
Toll free: 1-800-4UNICEF (1-800-486-4233)
Text: Text "FOOD" to UNICEF (864233) to donate $10
Mail: 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038

About UNICEF

UNICEF has saved more children's lives than any other humanitarian organization in the world. Working in more than 150 countries, UNICEF provides children with health care, clean water, nutrition, education, emergency relief, and more. The U.S. Fund for UNICEF supports UNICEF's work through fundraising, advocacy, and education in the United States.

UNICEF is at the forefront of efforts to reduce child mortality worldwide. There has been substantial progress: the annual number of under-five deaths dropped from 13 million in 1990 to 8.1 million in 2009. But still, 22,000 children die each day from preventable causes. Our mission is to do whatever it takes to make that number zero by giving children the essentials for a safe and healthy childhood. For more information, visit www.unicefusa.org.

SOURCE U.S. Fund for UNICEF

CONTACT: Susannah Masur, +1-212-880-9146, (m), +1-646-428-5010, smasur@unicefusa.org, or Kini Schoop, +1-212-922-2634, kschoop@unicefusa.org, both of U.S. Fund for UNICEF

Web Site: http://www.unicefusa.org


Friday, September 11, 2009

Global Child Mortality Continues to Drop

9/11 Remembrance Day.

10 Sep 2009 16:37 Africa/Lagos

Global Child Mortality Continues to Drop

UNICEF and UN Inter-Agency Panel Release New Figures

NEW YORK, Sept. 10 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- UNICEF today released new figures that show the rate of deaths of children under five years of age continued to decline in 2008.


The data shows a 28 percent decline in the under-five mortality rate, from 90 deaths per 1000 live births in 1990, to 65 deaths per 1000 live births in 2008. According to these estimates, the absolute number of child deaths in 2008 declined to an estimated 8.8 million from 12.5 million in 1990; the base line year for the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).


"Compared to 1990, 10,000 fewer children are dying every day," said UNICEF Executive Director Ann M. Veneman. "While progress is being made, it is unacceptable that each year 8.8 million children die before their fifth birthday."


The new estimates are the result of collection and analysis of a range of data sources by demographers and health experts from UNICEF, the World Health Organization, the World Bank and the United Nations Population Division, guided by technical advisors from a number of major academic institutions.


The data shows global under-five mortality has decreased steadily over the past two decades, and that the rate of the decline in the under-five mortality rates has increased since the 1990s. The average rate of decline from 2000 to 2008 is 2.3 percent, compared to a 1.4 percent average decline from 1990 to 2000.


"Statistics tend to be clinical and antiseptic, however the practical, real world implications of this development cannot be ignored," said Caryl Stern, President and CEO, U.S. Fund for UNICEF. "These new numbers illustrate that 1500 more kids a day are waking up to see the sunrise, play with their friends and make their mothers smile."


Public health experts attribute the continuing decline to increased use of key health interventions, such as immunizations, including measles vaccinations, the use of insecticide-treated bednets to prevent malaria and Vitamin A supplementation. Where these interventions have increased, positive results have followed.


Progress has been seen in every part of the world, and even in some of the least-developed countries. A key example is Malawi, one of ten high under-five mortality countries that is now on track to meet the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of a two-thirds reduction in under-five mortality between 1990 and 2015.


Estimates show that under-five mortality in Malawi has fallen from 225 deaths per 1000 live births in 1990, to 100 per thousand in 2008. In 2000, only 3 percent of children under five slept under a mosquito net - a key means of preventing malaria, whereas by 2006 this had risen to 25 percent. Malawi has focused its limited resources on improvements in health and health systems and the use of the most effective interventions, with the result that significant numbers of children's lives have been saved.


"We know what interventions work and we need to scale up those interventions and make sure they are available wherever they are needed," Stern added. "Reaching zero preventable deaths is not a dream, we can achieve this, but momentum shouldn't just be sustained, it has to be accelerated!"


The new data also shows that seven of the 67 high mortality countries (those with under-five mortality rates of 40 per thousand live births or higher) have consistently achieved annual rates of reduction of under-five mortality of 4.5 percent or higher. These are Nepal, Bangladesh, Eritrea, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Mongolia, Bolivia and Malawi.


Impressive gains have also been made in countries that are not fully on track to meet the Millennium goal. Niger, Mozambique and Ethiopia have all reduced under-five mortality by more than 100 per 1000 live births since 1990.


While progress has been made in many countries, the global rate of improvement is still insufficient to reach the MDG, and Africa and Asia combined still account for 93 percent of all under-five deaths that occur each year in the developing world.


"A handful of countries with large populations bear a disproportionate burden of under-five deaths, with 40 percent of the world's under-five deaths occurring in just three countries: India, Nigeria, and the Democratic Republic of Congo," said Veneman. "Unless mortality in these countries can be significantly reduced, the MDG targets will not be met."


In some countries, progress is slow or non-existent. In South Africa the under-five mortality rate has actually gone up since 1990. The health of the child is inextricably linked to the health of the mother and South Africa has the highest number of women living with HIV in the world. Recent commitments by the government to scale up interventions to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV/AIDS should help improve the situation.


The survey data incorporated in these estimates generally reflects mortality over the preceding three to five years. This means that major improvements in provision of nets for malaria prevention, of vaccines against meningitis (HiB) and of vitamin A supplementation, improved prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and of pediatric HIV, and further progress on protecting against measles and tetanus may not yet be fully reflected in the data.


Progress can be accelerated even in the poorest environments, through integrated, evidence-driven, community-based health programs that focus on addressing the major causes of death -- pneumonia, diarrhea, newborn disorders, malaria, HIV and under-nutrition.


The two leading causes of under-five mortality are pneumonia and diarrhea. New tools, such as vaccines against pneumococcal pneumonia and rotaviral diarrhea, could provide additional momentum.


"Achieving the Millennium Development Goal target of a two-thirds reduction in under-five mortality by 2015 will require a strong sense of urgency with targeted resources for greater progress," said Veneman.


About UNICEF


UNICEF has saved more children's lives than any other humanitarian organization in the world. Working in over 150 countries, UNICEF provides children with health care, clean water, nutrition, education, emergency relief, and more. The U.S. Fund for UNICEF supports UNICEF's work through fundraising, advocacy, and education in the United States.


UNICEF is at the forefront of efforts to reduce child mortality worldwide. There has been substantial progress--the annual number of under-five deaths dropped from 13 million in 1990 to 8.8 million in 2008. But still, 24,000 children die each day from preventable causes. Our mission is to do whatever it takes to make that number zero by giving children the essentials for a safe and healthy childhood. For more information, visit www.unicefusa.org.


Source: U.S. Fund for UNICEF

CONTACT: Richard Alleyne, +1-212-880-9177, ralleyne@unicefusa.org, or
Lauren Monahan, +1-212-880-9136, lmonahan@unicefusa.org, both of U.S. Fund for
UNICEF


Web Site: http://www.unicefusa.org/




Startup Weekend Nigeria Rocks!

Saturday, February 21, 2009

Nigerians Report and Guaranty Success Reported in This Day of Nigeria

The launch of two of my news blogs was reported in This Day newspaper in Nigeria last Thursday February 19, 2009. The new blog Nigerians Report - http://www.nigeriansreport.com/ and GUARANTY SUCCESS - http://www.guarantysuccess.com/ and the following is the news report in full.

2 News Blogs Launched

Nigerians Report.com and Guaranty Success.com are two of the most popular Nigerian news and information blogs on the internet, rich with 24 hours news videos from the BBC, Reuters, AP, ABC and other major news channels in the world.

"If you want breaking news from the grassroots, go to Nigerians Report.com and if you want better jobs and better career opportunities and free books on all subjects, Guaranty Success.com has it all," said Ekenyerengozi Michael Chima, the Publisher and Editor, who is fast developing the largest Nigerian news and information portal on the internet with over 37 websites so far.

Nigerians Report has been created to promote citizen journalism in Nigeria and so it is a Free For All (FFA) internet news blog for all literate Nigerians to report their own news and tell their own true life stories 24 hours daily.

"Nigerians are the best reporters of what is happening in Nigeria, because we are in the best position to break our own news and tell our own stories before the CNN, BBC or Sky rush to do so, "Michael Chima elaborated.

Guaranty Success.com is in fact the most syndicated Nigerian business success website. It has been syndicated more than 200, 000 times.

"My mission is to bridge the wide gap in communication between Nigeria and the rest of the world on the internet, and stop the misinformation and miseducation of millions of ignorant people on the internet, whose erroneous and ambiguous notions of Nigeria and Nigerians should be corrected to stop the further damage on the image of Nigeria and the global village," Michael Chima said.

...........................................................................................

Contact: Ekenyerengozi Michael Chima, Publisher/Editor, Tel: 234 07032366127

publisher@nigeriantimesinternational.com


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